Symbolic Portraiture

Michael Fratangelo creates a compelling style with his painting.

I was honored to be welcomed into the studio of an artist to discuss his process & document his technique. People who whet their skills, persistence, talent & technique to create art define their own space. It is a place to be respected. Alone in a building on the third floor the work Michael Fratangelo does in his studio is primarily at night. Maybe Quincy Jones was on to something when he said “The muse come out at night.”

I first saw his work at Ketchup City Creative.  This powerful series was recognized & exhibited in Europe. The subject of the paintings was the War in Iraq. The series reflected photos from the NYT. I was taken back by the size of the paintings some as large as 6’ by 8’. My eyes welcomed the pallet of colors.  His style is such that the oil-on-canvas is thick & chunky giving an added element of form.  I was intrigued by how he defines his Symbolic Portraits. I was preparing my own Portraiture themed gallery show & his work was an unexpected perspective into defining a portrait. Classic portraits of people are not what he produces. The work I saw in his brochure gave me new eyes. Boldly, I asked if I could visit his studio to document his work.

My minds eye of a painter’s space is not what I found. From a photographers perspective the lighting was mixed & poorly distributed. Working at night the windows provided no source of naturally soft light. Mirror like, they only reflected glares. The primary light was florescent & he used 2 thrift-store-rejected pole lamps for the work in front of him. I quickly realized all Michael needed was illumination! The work was coming from his mind to his hands. Watching him work I began to understand his comment “Painting is stronger than me. It makes me do what it wants”. This is a place where the muse may visit.

 I’m not an art critic & lack their classic adjectives, adverbs & education to describe paintings. I can say that visually his paintings have strength. Since it is Michael’s work I accept his description of “using symbolism to create spiritually guided portraits”. Adjusting the viewer’s awareness to a different type of portrait resonated with me.

Some artists make sketches or drafts that play an important role in their work. For Michael, a critical step is interviewing & understand the person. What he learns becomes layers in the painting he creates. A common topic includes mentors & individuals that have inspired. Family snapshots showing decades of change in the person hang on the wall alongside of where he works. The favorite food in somebodies life can sneak into the symbolism coming from his brushes. The colors & forms Michael sees are a part of the spiritual aspects of the people he paints.

Allen Levine, who Michael has known for years, commissioned the project I photographed. Allen is an outgoing person with passion for sports. He hosts a local talk show calling himself the Talking Machine. The symbolism in his portrait reveals his character with forms & color from Michael.

Michael never started out to be an artist coming close to never recognizing his gift. As a student he was adrift. During our conversations he frequently discussed how John Bowman, one of his professors at Penn State, encouraged him to develop his own voice on the canvas using his intuitive sense of color. After that, he avoided academic probation & was on a path to understanding & developing his talent.

Michael has confidence he is where he needs to be with his art. His role as a Middle School teacher “inspiring his students to simply avoid being afraid to be creative” is part of his personality. He recognizes the value of ingenuity across all learning. Having found his talent he looks to help others discover theirs.  This provides motivation outside the studio. As a member of the board of Penn State’s College of Art & Architecture he gives back to the place where he found his gift.

I asked what artists inspired him. Of particular interest were sculptors Henry Moore from Britain & Michelangelo Buonarroti of Italy. I found it somewhat odd that sculptors influenced a painter working in a 2 dimensional medium until I researched their work. Both had a mystical view of their work, that the sculptors already lay in the marble they were uncovering. Michael considers himself more of a sculptor than a painter. Instead of using hammer chisel & stone, Michael has a similar belief he is uncovering his work like the sculptors but with brush, palette knife & oil paint.

 Michael daringly describes himself as a visionary artist. With early international recognition of his style, he now is earning commissions for his unique portraits. I do not doubt that his work may reach a new level. For now, he continues to produce his dynamic colorful symbolic portraits while trying to put a dent in the universe.

This new blog format I am using will allow you to click on the photographs to see them full frame. Feedback appreciated.


Critique Reinforced a Change in Direction

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I recently went to a portfolio review hosted by Richard Kelly. Not only was it valuable to hear critique of my own images but the overall evening was insightful. The experience of seeing the work of other photographers while listening to the critique of their work motivated me in an unexpected way.

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Sue Abramson was the artist doing the reviews. Prior to her individual review of the each photographers work, she gave a presentation of her book “A Woodlands Journal”. Her imagery was captivating. But most impressive to me was her commitment to the subject for 4 decades. It reinforced how much I just bounce around with my camera.

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I was torn between the styles of presentation of her review. The projected digital images allowed the entire group to see in a theater setting. However, all of the bumps associated with electronic presentation were there.

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I do enjoy looking at a print & this method of review allowed a broader critique of the images as well as the perspective of examining the story/style. The downside was that it’s hard for a group of people to gather around a table to engage with what she was saying & demonstrating. The options for sharing our work are numerous & should be molded to the venue and the viewer.

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Most of the work of the other photogs at the review had some sort of underlying nucleus. It was inspiring to see & learn about the vision of talented local photographers who have, or are exploring, a personal style in their artistic endeavors.

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During all of her critiques it wasn’t so much the specific comments she gave that resonated with me. It was her overall perspective looking at the collections of the images of the other photographers that opened a new vista for me.

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My “portfolio of images” had no theme & is best described as eclectic without foundation. I doubt my motivation in photography will ever become focused on one genre. I believe I am destined to be a generalist. I have recognized this for a while & embrace the diversity. However, the next review session I take part in I will put together a theme of images, which I believe will result in a more valuable feedback.

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Critiquing my images Ms. Abramson encouraged me to pursue subjects I mentioned I enjoy like dance & sailboats while giving relevant critique on some of my other images. I realized that on this blog the written support is the strength of my style of story telling. While my images on any particular posting have some commonality, the visual theme usually is linked by the text. I’ve put more emphasis on prose than image continuity in an effort to improve my writing.

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As you can see by the images in this posting, the subjects of my photography are diverse. I like the challenge of some subjects. I believe it’s important to document the human condition. Often something will just catch my eye. People have so many varied activities I am motivated to capture candid moments. The beauty in the natural world is an inspiring subject. I’ve gotten better at tuning my eyes to light & shadow. I also have become comfortable with Photoshop to enhance or occasionally modify an image. I’ve even ventured into the challenges of Black & White. The title of the Scorsese film about Dylan No Direction Home resonates.

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I can not ignore the inspiration I got in my youth from photojournalism. I will still attempt to capture moments that resonate ideas. However, the ability of using photography to expand & explore creative points of view is something I will try to embrace.

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My take away from the evening motivated me to change my publishing schedule for this blog from twice a month to a more relaxed “whenever I have something to say” deadline. I had been feeling some self-inflicted pressure to do the 2-blog postings a month I’ve done since 11/15. I’m now motivated to explore a more visually dominate approach to story telling. I’ve proven to myself the writing of stories to accompany my photos in the style of “show & tell” is something I can do.

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I will be interested to see where this leads. Comments & suggestions are always welcome. After 73 blogs that began over 3 years ago using over 58 thousand words I no longer find value in a self-imposed deadline. Spelling… always a work in progress.

Urban Inspiration

Walk around any city & you’ll find public art. Some statues or murals may be commissioned or you may see the work of an illicit painter’s creativity. Even some marketing signs have an artistic flair. Whatever the intent, these visual distractions can make a mundane environment more interesting.

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The symmetrical sharp shapes of these windows with multiple panels are softened with the colorful arched design that surrounds them. The static pattern of bricks has almost disappeared into the background with the outlined form of columns. The artistic accents incorporated onto the basic form of the structure add to the character of the old building while giving a hint to what is inside.

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The sides of buildings where a parking lot has been squeezed into the empty space provide an opportunity for many types of murals. Usually work done in these spaces provide vivid color to an otherwise drab wall.

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Statues of Ancient Greece represented gods while some rulers hoping to immortalize themselves had their likeness carved in stone. In this country many of our civic monuments pay tribute to important individuals. No form of art is ever static. In the recent past objects, forms & surrealistic sculptures began to appear in public spaces often representing ideas. Empty Suit by Erwin Wurm in St. Louis fascinated me. Humanity has been removed from a typical form on a pedestal & the color demands your attention.

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Not to far from Empty Suit I found a sculpture commonly know as Hollow Head or just plain Head. I later learned its official name is Eros Bendato sculpted by Igor Mitoraj. Initially I enjoyed the absurdity of the work but discovered that Eros is the Greek God of love & desire. By making me smile when I first saw it & later thinking of what the artist may have been saying, this public art did it’s job.

05 copyWhile this wall in Mostar, riddled with the bullet holes, is definitely not the work of an artist. It does speaks to me in a more powerful way than any urban environment I’ve ever been in. During the war in Bosnia Herzegovina in the 1990’s, this city, which had been a beacon of coexistence between a cultural, religious & ethnic population, was laid siege. Centuries of cooperation & tolerance eroded into an atmosphere of distrust & anger. It is a constant reminder of the the lasting scars from the savagery of war.

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Translation…I am Fidel. My trip to Cuba was 2 months after Fidel died. One of Castro’s last wishes was for no monuments to be erected in his honor to avoid a cult of personality. The few murals I saw were of faded revolutionary icons. During my 2 weeks on the island I saw very little graffiti. I found it odd that with Cuba’s rich artistic culture I did not see more art in public places. 07

The attempt to brighten up an alley in downtown Denver with a dramatic work of art seemed like a good idea. However, the alley will always be a place for garbage dumpsters. The stark reality of the graffiti tagged container defines the superiority of function over form in this environment.

08This mural alongside a parking lot in the Strip District of Pittsburgh is also an advertisement for the business inside the building. Getting your attention is a shared goal of art & marketing. Both the design & the message are simple. In my mind’s eye that harmony helps to make it effective without being offensive. It also has balanced proportion with the cars in in front of it.

09Anyone with a bit of technical knowledge about video will immediately associate the color bars in the mural with TV. The iconic Apple logo requires no further explanation. Yet again it is on a wall beside a parking lot. In this case, the enormity of it with the stark design I find irritating. I’m not a graphic designer but somehow I think Apple could have used the space with a more creative brush. Just because it looks good on a monitor doesn’t always translate to the environment people will see it.

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On Beal St. in Memphis businesses uses unique signs to get tourists attention to lure them in & spend money. A clever name or a creative sign are the norm. One sign that grabbed my eye was the Pepsi Sign. The artist credited is Mark Davey. I can’t say for certain but this seems to be his unique expression of creative promotion not a Pepsi campaign.

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It’s no surprise that in the digital era urban art now includes video sculptures. At Millennial Park in Chicago, Crown Fountain displays dynamic images along with LED lighting presentations. The 50 foot tall screen can be overpowering when it shows the faces of about 1,000 faces of people from Chicago. The images of the faces are not static. Periodically a stream of water will shoot out of the subject’s mouth. From the appropriate distance it speaks to the diversity of humanity.   Hopefully it will never be used for advertising. In my opinion mediocre art is superior to most marketing eyesores.

Revisiting Motivation

I’ve taken shots that caught me eye with no real idea why I snapped the shutter. Examining these shots I’ve not looked at for a few years was an interesting self-critique.  The close ups, details & perspectives are examples of my evolution with a still camera giving me clues to understanding my personal vision.

01By reviewing this shot I realized the fractal forms on this rooftop is what originally grabbed my eye. Recognizing my attraction to the pattern of the subject created an inspiration to explore the world of “Digital Art” Although this isn’t a genre I wish to spend much time with I did realize more about my initial attraction to the subject. This modification retains the strong structure while the added color & highlights have added a dimension non-existent in the original.

02 Bubbles.2I’ve always liked this shot as just a snapshot. The abstract quality disappears when your mind interprets what you see. The ½ sphere shapes are clues to realizing you are looking at bubbles on the surface of water. My latent photojournalist ethics of Photoshop no longer keep me from modifying an image. Enhancing the red & blue reflections added a separation creating a subtle juxtaposition while emphasizing the forms.

03How close is to close? Originally I was looking at the bees as the subject. But, as I was slowly approaching this nest to get my shot I was fascinated with the detail of the hive. Realizing that I didn’t want to be close for an extended amount of time I recognized a medium close up showing the bees & the contours of the structure they created was a more interesting image than just isolating the hole with the bees.  I’m slowly realizing a wider shot can be better story. I admire the collective ability & dedication of these sometime annoying creatures.

04 old oakUnless you are aware of the Fibonacci Equation or The Golden Spiral, this image of a 600 year old oak log is not all that interesting. Wandering thru the boatyard at Mystic Seaport the form in this cutaway screamed at me. If you take the time to look you can see some amazing things created by nature.

05 iron workHuman beings can also do some amazing things. The smelting of metals is ancient. Centuries ago the structural strength of iron was formed into security for doors & windows. Past generations have enjoyed the artistic as well as the pragmatic function of this medium. I suppose that somewhere a 3D printer is in the process of producing 21st century wrought iron railing. I’m not usually a fan of symmetry but this work is an exception because of the seemingly soft details on a hard material.

06North MeadowThe most challenging previsualization for me to grasp is with my wide-angle zoom. A close-up/wide shot is not something my mind’s eye can easily envision. This is one of the few times I did indeed make the most out of the optics. Lying on the ground in the North Meadow of Yosemite I was thrilled to find this back-lit flower & create an image I had seen in my mind. I was also pleasantly surprised to see the distant mountains softly out of focus since I was shooting at f16.

07 coat of arms montenegroThis 2-headed eagle is a symbol of Montenegro on their flag & coat of arms. We mostly think of crests like this being from centuries ago. It is an ancient visual representing  power & dominance. This version was formally approved by this Balkan nation in 2007. The 2 eagles holding religious symbols in their talons symbolize the close connections between church & state. The detail of the work enhances the power of the image.

08 rails londonAs a visual metaphor, train tracks have a history as an example of A Vanishing Point as well as Leading Lines. In my mind, the curving merger of 2 primary tracks is not as cliche. My initial reaction was the foreground flora interfered with this somewhat distinct view of a common subject. However, the color & the organic structure are a juxtaposition to steel rails which I now feel are an important part of the image.

09 Blood ChainI have seen a lot of rust which has interesting texture with deep brown blended with dark orange. This “Blood Rust” chain I saw really caught my attention. Could it be minerals in the rocks or salt from the ocean or a combination of both created this uncommon color in the old chain? Or is it because of the chemical make up of the steel that gives it a unique hue? It was with further examination I understood it was the hue that drew me to snap the shutter.

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In my opinion, the challenge of getting a close-up or macro shots of insects usually is not worth the effort. When I saw the grasshopper on the stark background I was motivated to try.  It was also convenient that I had my 100-400 on the camera.It also is a reinforcement of the need to look down at the ground for interesting subjects & angles.

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I was on a location scout for a possible documentary about a historic Federal style home. It would have been a nice project but never moved forward. Initially, I was just looking for window lighting & backdrops for interviews. Then I noticed the wallpaper.  Alice in Wonderland gave a clue to the last time this room had been redecorated becoming a visual part of the historic story of this home. Details can be enlightening.

Inspired by New Eyes

 

01Learning new things can be part of the joy of going to a museum. I was familiar with the responsibilities of the audio person credited as the Folley Artist but never knew it was in recognition of an individual. At the Comedy Center in Jamestown, NY I learned a little bit about this man that made a very significant contribution to many forms of entertainment. Why did none of the great audio engineers I worked with never tell me that? Naturally there is a “boom shadow” in my frame. A few will understand.

02Anybody that knows me is aware I’m not a big fan of comedy. I only saw Blazing Saddles after it was listed in the top 100 films of last century. I do however understand & appreciate the role of comedy in entertainment, culture & history so going to the new Comedy Center was something I was looking forward to. A significant foundation of this museum is the contribution of George Carlin’s archive given by his daughter Kelly. The advisory board is represented by both well know active comedians as well as “seasoned” multi-disciplined performers & their families.

03All aspects of comedy from stand-up to cartoon strips & every media in between is well represented. As a child of the 60’s the TV room was one of my favorite displays. As with many of the exhibits your “personalized chip” on your wristband helps create a customized presentation to genre or comedian. Most multi-screen programs I have seen are filled with visual clutter. At the Comedy Center it is very well programed. Dave Taylor…you need to see this. The only disappointment was in the holographic presentation. With refinements it may become better. For now it seems to be a presentation medium in it’s infancy.

04I know & respect that Chautauqua County, where this is located, has a conservative population. I was curious as to how they would handle the profanity component of comedy. They choose a simple but effective solution called the “Blue Room”. If you are offended by words don’t go in. I learned of a connection between Carlin & Lenny Bruce I wasn’t aware of. In a photo of Bruce being arrested you see Carlin in the background also being arrested. In this photo from the Blue Room, notice the speaker in the parabolic dome hanging from the ceiling. It is focusing the audio for the viewers in front of the screen while reducing the “audio clutter”. VERY WELL done! The attention to visual & audio details throughout the center is some of the best I’ve ever seen.

05It is amazing that one individual can have such a significant impact in a way few could ever imagine. The seed of an idea to honor a local celebrity has grown into a world-class memorial to her craft. It began with a collection of memorabilia of one of the most significant & powerful entertainment couples in television at the Lucy & Desi Museum. Now, at the National Comedy Center a few blocks away, are archived some of the most influential, & funny, materials from generations of “A List” comedians that make us laugh by looking at our world thru different glasses.

06The ARTECHOUSE in DC was showing an “Immersive, Interactive Installation” which blended projected digital art with motion sensors. The lighting environment was superb for the primary room while the dominate images of Cherry Blossoms by Sukura Yume floated on the walls. The sensitivity of the sensors allowed visitors to interact with the floating flowers causing mostly subtle changes in the displays. The centered calligraphy display by Aoi Yamaguchi, was an intriguing component that provided a static dimension to the flowing relaxing space. The soundtrack of the room was done by Debrina.

07This young lady was demonstration the most effective way to interact with the artwork. In a position where the motion sensors could easily detect her she was slowly moving using broad gestures that resembled a yoga routine. Her connection to the art was in a very personal space. To describe the room to people of my generation it was like taking a journey on The Yellow Submarine thru a bowl of cereal made by Peter Max while listening to an 8 Track of Ravi Shankar.

08The Koi Pie 3D sculpture by Nathan Solomon & Karan Parikh was created using computer controlled machines then primed & painted with special video screen paint to display detailed projections. The real time interaction with this smaller dynamic sculpture with fine detail brought art into a more intimate space.

09Bloom by Story Lab was my favorite piece. It did not have any pre-developed background. The table was a clean canvas where only the movements of the people were used to create splashes of color. With no disrespect to the artists it was like finger painting without any of the mess. Here at ARTECHOUSE & at The National Comedy Center I found examples of why I love digital. The interaction of storytelling, technology & art can inspire even an old-school visitor.

Motivation is Rewarded

01After photographing dance in Cuba & then at Chautauqua Institute in 2017 I was hooked on this subject. Earlier this year I sent out emails to potential resources seeking to collaborate. This gave me the opportunity to explore other genres & environments of dance. The basic challenges of capturing dynamic images during rehearsals or stage performances were the same as the limited ballet photography I had done. That experience proved to be of value.

02Attack Theater performances are of the modern/contemporary genre. Although the dancers choreography is significantly different than classical ballet, the movement, athleticism & the forms are entertaining & inspiring. I did notice that more often than not, the number of dancers on the stage was an even number. I prefer odd numbers of primary subjects but I was able to adapt.

03During a tech rehearsal I was able to be very close with my 40mm lens allowing me to capture some of the facial emotions, which are an important aspect of this performance. The side lighting was typical for a stage performance but the production also included projected images on the background screen. The imagery of the projections added to the impact of the performance. However, for still images it was distracting when on the dancers body. This image is a good example of why I like odd numbers of subjects.

04“Game Night” was a chance for Attack Theater to engage with the audience in a relaxed atmosphere while developing an upcoming performance. The space is a rehearsal hall with no defined seating for the audience. This was a good opportunity for me to be close enough to use my 28mm. I targeted to pools of light waiting for the dancers to move into them. The background worked surprisingly well. Stage lighting, while not always good for photography, can create strong shadows.

05Using the shadow to make this a 3 shot works for me. The ISO is high making it grainy but that’s OK. At first the wooden apple box bothered me but the strong low/side lighting on it adds to the geometry in the frame. This is an image I would like to choreograph for photography. I also like the re-crop to a 2 X 1 format.

06Wide shots with empty space can be as dramatic as a close-up & can be an important part of the story. Each of the dancers hit the perfect mark for the lighting. Positioned near stage left & slightly elevated I was able to add some dimension while including well-lit props. Even when the dancers are not moving, I believe including the space they are in reinforces their form. Using the 2 X 1 crop again, I emphasized the weight of the lower 1/3 pulling your attention down to the floor.

07Call it modern or contemporary, the movements & choreography on stage are entertaining. Attack Theater incorporates music & theater into a dance performance I found as powerful as my limited exposure to more classic ballet. The human form is a wonderful brush to paint with. Including emotion with character while doing this provides an inspiring performance that sticks in your mind.

08In a post from 6/15/18 I explored the creative process of Mary Miller & Charles Hall as they developed a dance piece with a story-line about friendship. My early involvement with their work allowed me to know when & where to be to get that moment while providing a better understanding of creative development.  Initially I was disappointed at the vertical split of the background in this shot but I got over it. The strong lighting & the facial expressions dominated my eye. The motion blur of his right hand is a nice reinforcement to the message on his face.

09bAt the performance of the Nandanic Dance Festival I had the chance to see different styles of Indian dance. It is not Ballet or Modern. These performers have exclusive genres of movement with elaborate costumes & make-up. In this medium close-up shot it is easy to see the importance of the eyes & facial expression in the character of the dancer.

10Another dancer in the Nandanic performance provided his own soundtrack as he choreographed his drum playing with impressive dancing. The combination of coordination, musical talent & expression made this piece exciting.

11While I thoroughly enjoyed the performance on the stage, as a photographer, I would like to have controlled lighting in a studio with this genre of dancers. The costume, the jewelry, the make-up when used on these performers deserves special attention separate from a live performance.

12My initial attraction to this image came after I cropped it square. The depth & the balance worked well. However the lighting, the background and the color were distracting. With no offense to photogs that do good B/W, sometime just removing the Chroma can make an OK image much better. I am fortunate that I was able to explore more dance photography. Come 2019 I will try to coordinate more opportunities or even enroll in a workshop.

What I did this Summer

01 7D2L1093 copy.1More than anytime during the recent past I spent a lot of this summer reflecting. The slower pace of summer at Chautauqua provides a space where introspective motivation is easy. The passing of time is a partner with the changes in our lives. They bring both dark & bright moments that alter my perspective on my life & the world around me.

02This summer, volunteering for the Bemus Point Stow Ferry didn’t include any trips across the narrows. Dry-docked for repairs I was able to document some of the work necessary for it to pass safety inspection. I did become a 3rd grade apprentice grinder working on the deck. As a “Steel-town Boy” I got a taste of the type of work my hometown is known for. I have confidence that the Ferry will be back in the water continuing her 3rd century of service to Chautauqua Lake. I am proud to be able to help keep this historic icon operating as well as accepting a position on the Board of Directors.

03 05Wip copy copyI know to many good bird photographers to say I am one. However, when I’m sitting on my front porch watching a Northern Flicker pose I will take advantage of the opportunity. The Kingfisher that occasionally sits on the mast of my sailboat continues to eluded my camera.

04Golf is a perfect sport for my 100-400 lens. During the Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy’s tournament I was able to get a very high percentage of images I was happy with. Knowing the basics of the game, recognizing where good foreground/background locations were as well as having very nice weather allowed me to enjoy a very pleasant day on the links. I thought about picking up my clubs this summer but didn’t. I’m doubtful playing golf will become anything more than a minor part of my retirement. So much for stereotypes.

05Often the voices of nature can complement the serenity of the outdoors in a way that is uniquely familiar. The shoreline of ponds isn’t fully complete unless you hear the voices of frogs. I find it a great exercise for my eyes to find them in the weeds or the shallows of the water. It isn’t often I can get close enough to get a good image but if they are going to make it easy by sitting on a log I will make an attempt to grab a shot.

06I enjoy portraiture but for me it is difficult with people I know. That doesn’t mean I will stop trying. Since I have known Barb Koerner all of my life I can’t begin to explain the many deep qualities this portrait captures. Much of what the image means to me is totally unseen by the camera. It is my personal knowledge of the “sense of place” that is an untold story of this wonderful woman. Other than my family, this may be my best capture of someone I know. OBTW the pie was homemade from fresh hand picked blueberries!

07 7D2L1156 copy copyRecognizing your tastes helps define your motivation. I like boats. I enjoy old school as part of my life. I appreciate the craftsmanship of people that create & preserve things with wood. Knowing that, I stalked some participants in a local wooden boat show. This classic Chris Craft arriving from the north had beautiful early am sun that highlighted the high gloss of the wood. The strong sunlight also painted the contrasting green trees in the background giving a nice balanced hue to the image. If only I could have been about 5 degrees higher to have isolated the bow flag against the water. I always look for ways to make something better.

08 7D2L0735 copy copyDriving the back roads of Chautauqua County I spotted this farm on wash-day. My photographer’s instinct immediately thought leading lines. I realized that unless I invaded the family’s property I really couldn’t explore the full potential of this setting. Since I was on my way somewhere I just took this generic wide shot. It serves as a seed for future opportunities.

09 7D2L0848 copy copyEven though I’m less than satisfied with images of musicians I have taken, there is still a lure I can’t resist. I also believe many of the best shots I’ve seen include the interaction of 2 or more musicians. However, the smaller mandolin fit nicely into a tight single frame. The mustache, goatee, sunglasses & hat gave this musician character worthy of an attempt of musical portraiture. The Blue Heron Music Festival did a good job of providing entertaining music that didn’t overwhelm the audience with the volume.

daf01_8 copy copyThe life cycle of monarch butterflies is almost as amazing as watching them dancing in the wind. Thinking about their journeys as these frail creatures migrate across much of North America, I am in awe of their capacity. Splashing the landscape with color they intensify the beauty of flowers. They remind me not to ignore the simple pleasure of each & every day.